Appliances



When looking for energy efficient appliances for your home, you need to look out for the energy ratings label on appliances and consider the size of the appliance that you require.


• Use microwaves and toaster ovens to cook or warm leftovers. You’ll use less energy than cooking with a conventional oven.
• The ideal temperature setting for a refrigerator is 3ºC and for a freezer it's -18ºC. Use the power-save switch if you have one.
• Repair refrigerator door seals if you feel cold air around the closed door or if moisture is collecting.
• Replace a refrigerator with an ENERGY STAR®-qualified model – energy-efficient models cost less to operate than older refrigerators.
• Dust your fridge the next time you dust your house. Check the coils behind the refrigerator — and use coil vacuums or dusters to clean it off and keep costs down.
• Keep your freezer full – it uses less energy than an empty one.
• Choose energy-efficient appliances. They don’t just save you money, but they’re good for the environment because they use less energy.
• Replace your refrigerator. Choose models with improved insulation and power-saving switches.
• Avoid over-drying your clothes. It wastes energy, plus causes static and wrinkling. • Separate wash loads into light and heavy fabrics for the shortest drying times. Or better yet – air-dry your lightest fabrics.
• Vent your dryer to the outside to reduce the workload on your air conditioner.
• Wash full loads of clothes when possible. When smaller loads are necessary, use less water.
• Hang dress clothing to air dry on portable laundry racks; they will also look better.
• Clean the dryer lint filter before every load to keep your dryer running efficiently.
• Set your dishwashers on economy mode, to use less water and electricity.
• Turn off your dishwasher after the wash cycle — and let your dishes air-dry. You'll save energy and keep your dishwasher from heating up your kitchen.
• Keep the oven door closed while cooking – the temperature can drop by as many as 25 degrees each time you open the oven door.
• Grill out more often during the summer. Using the oven in the heat of summer forces your AC to work harder, which raises your energy bill.
• Use copper-bottomed pots and pans that use heat more efficiently when cooking on the stove.
• Keep stove reflector pans clean to reflect more heat upward while cooking.
• Turn off your oven or burners when food is almost ready and let existing heat finish the cooking for you.
• Use tight-fitting covers on pots and pans when cooking on the stove to shorten your cooking time and save energy.
• Match your pot size to the burner on your stove. Heat is lost when small pots are used on large burners.
• Turn off kitchen and bath fans immediately after use.
• Plug electronics into a power strip, then turn the strip off when not in use to save in energy costs.
• Avoid energy vampires. Even when they’re turned off, home electronics in “standby” mode use energy to power features like clock displays.
• Look for ENERGY STAR-qualified TVs – they’re up to 30 percent more efficient than noncertified models.
• Consider a laptop next time you're looking to buy a computer – they use less energy than desktop computers.
• Set your computer to sleep or hibernate mode instead of using a screen saver so it uses less electricity during periods of inactivity.
• Unplug battery chargers when the batteries are fully charged or the chargers are not in use. Many chargers draw power continuously, even when the device is not plugged into the charger.